For Want Of An Icon…

…and 36 hours later, I ended up with a new web domain.

It started mildly enough as I was modifying my web page. I was changing the colors and pictures, trying to get everything the way that I wanted. Half-way through making changes, I looked up at the tab within Google Chrome, and was greeted by a black and white earth.

Normally, with other websites and pages, there is a custom icon to the left of the page name. This icon (also called a favicon) is also used as the symbol for the webpage when bookmarked. Not knowing how to change this within WordPress, I begain to search on Google.

The search immediately took me to the instructions showing how to modify the coding of the page to insert a favicon. It seemed simple enough… until after spending about 15 minutes looking through the website editor without finding the correct menu for the site code. Turns out that the host (blogs.is.vt.edu) had disabled the option to edit code, along with many of the other features present.

From a security point of view, it makes sense to disable the coding option for all of the users. A user who thinks they know what they are doing can be much worse than a user who has no idea what they are doing. Still, I wanted to see if there was a way that I could get the favicon.

More searching around on Google brought me to the WordPress site. I found the download and installation instructions for the blog software, so I began reading through them. About halfway through the instructions, I noticed that they kept referring to the computer as a server. The reason why is that in order for the software to work, it had to be installed on a server.

Turns out that there are two different WordPress websites. One, wordpress.org, is for having the software installed on a server. The server can be either personally owned, or the space can be rented by a hosting company. The other website, wordpress.com, is for having the blog stored on WordPress servers. Since nearly all of the server hosting companies require a yearly or monthly payment, I decided to go with wordpress.com as the host.

There is an even easier method for changing the favicon without having to mess with coding (which is disabled on the free edition of wordpress).  Within the general settings is the option to add a blog icon. This replaces the default favicon with a custom one, which is what I was trying to modify in the first place.

So even though I took one of the longest routes available, I finally got the favicon I wanted. I think it helps add a more finished touch to the blog. Another bonus is that the icon fits well with the name. Plus, I can look for instructions for wordpress.com instead of mixing it up with wordpress.org. I hope to do more with the design in the future.

Take care, and remember to keep all carry-on liquids under 3.4 ounces!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s